Corporate Culture: The Sleeping Beast

Culture an any form, is the shared value and beliefs a group of people follow. When it comes to organizational culture, the ‘shared’ value and beliefs in an organization, governs how people behave and their decisions.

Or in more simple terms, “Culture is how organizations ‘do things’.” — Robbie Katanga*

How important is it? Well, Tony Hsieh (CEO, Zappos.com) said,

If you get the culture right, most of the other stuff will just take care of itself.”

 

We all know how Google is known for their ‘awesome’ corporate culture*. The facilities provided at their head-office, is in itself a jaw-dropper, but their continuous importance given to office atmosphere, employee recognition, and community welfare has made Google’s corporate culture into a benchmark most companies strive to achieve.

But what if a company doesn’t pay attention to all that. They don’t have well-incorporated values, neither they find any importance in recognizing employee accomplishments. This behavior then leads to top-management pursuing personal agendas, middle-management slacks off and lower-management gets the grit of the work. Organizational politics may ensue and overall employee productivity may drop. Okay, all that maybe a bit exaggerated. But I’m saying based on experience (albeit a couple of years).

For example; manager disagrees with their boss for a medium-impact-but-high-budget item, boss wouldn’t budge from their decision or would stall the approval, manager starts to micromanage the team, atmosphere become intolerable during meetings, everyone has a bad day at work.

Now the above might happen anywhere, but how often does it happen? Is the Boss (probably a Baby-Boomer) at fault for being stingy against change? Is the Manager (probably a Gen-X) being stubborn because they want recognition? Is the Team (probably Millennials) being exploited because well, they are millennials?

When I was job-hunting; among all other company/position characteristics, I paid attention to corporate culture most of the time. I will effect how I’ll work, what I’ll do, and most importantly, if I’ll like to work there and how I’ll grow as an employee – as a person.

So depending on who manages the unit, department, or the organization; they will have considerable amount of power over how the organizational culture is developed within their ‘territory’. Specially when an organization is in a silo-structure, it becomes important to make sure that each silo has a strong culture in itself.

 

Corporate Culture is the intangible, internal beast of the organization that is sleeping. you can let it sleep, or awaken it and win over your competition.

 

🙂 FTK

 

Credits:

1* What is Organizational Culture?” Via HBR

2* Google’s Organizational Culture Via OfficeVibe

 

Photo via VisualHunt.com

Workforce Equality: A Fleeting Dream?

According to World Bank Data (1), female participation rate in Labor Force has dropped from 52% to 49.5% in the last 20 years. Furthermore, based on Deloitte Board Diversity Census (2), Women in C-Suite Roles of Fortune 500 Companies are a mere 20% in 2016, of which only 3.8% are minorities.

It’s the twenty-first century and female representation in workforce is this weak.

Several reasons contribute to this problem on larger scale:

Cultural Norms
The ideology that women are the ‘house maker’ in conservative cultures and developing nations, often leave women less accomplished then their male counterparts. In some cases, women aren’t even educated enough to do even the least skilled job, and that is “if” they are allowed to even work in the first place.

Industry Stereotypes
Some industries have become highly male-dominant, such as Accounting and Finance, or Technology. In these industries, a career path for a female worker is often riddled with roadblocks and managers’ bias. Even if women do enter such field, they are likely to be harassed into quitting their job sooner or later.

Laws and Regulations
Issues like Wage Gap and Paid Maternity Leave are still an existing issue in many countries. Businesses aren’t doing enough to address this.

 

World Economic Forum (3) stated in their Global Gender Gap Report 2016, that it could take 170 years to close the gender gap.

 

So here’s hoping to a future of workforce equality.
Here’s to the girls of tomorrow that will break that glass ceiling.
Here’s to the girls of today that challenge stereotypes.
The world is waiting…

 

🙂 FTK

 

Credits:
(1) The World Bank, “Labor Force Participation Rate, Female (% of Female Population Ages 15+) (Modeled ILO Estimate),The World Bank Databank (2016).
(2) Deloitte and Alliance for Board Diversity, Missing Pieces Report: The 2016 Board Diversity Census of Women and Minorities on Fortune 500 Boards (2017).
(3) The World Economic Forum, The Global Gender Gap Report 2016 (2016).

Photo via Visual Hunt